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The Feeling Buddha

A group in which to discuss the most basic teachings of Shakyamuni Buddha.

Members: 88
Latest Activity: Aug 9, 2016

A group in which to discuss the humanity of Buddha, and, in particular, to reflect upon the teachings given in the three core early sutras called:
- Setting in Motion the Wheel of the Dharma
- The Non-Self Teaching
- The Fire Sermon

The book David Brazier : The Feeling Buddha is a reflection upon the first of these texts. It is commonly read as an introduction to Buddhism.

There are many ways to approach the interpretation of Buddha's earliest teachings. My own approach has included certain assumptions:
1. that Shakyamuni was speaking in terms that are not technical or esoteric most of the time - that his teaching is open to all
2. that his enlightenment turned his life around in a major way and that what he would want is for us to gain the benefit of his experience rather than follow in the footsteps of his pre-enlightenment path
3. that Buddha spoke from a great depth of humanity and feeling rather than from aloofness.

A course on this theme is planned for 13-14 June 2009 at The Buddhist House. This film clip is a trailer for that course.

Discussion Forum

When Someone is Dying How Can I Help?

Started by Bhodi Anjo Daishin Jan 8, 2011. 0 Replies

What is the Nature of Spiritual Training?

Started by Dharmavidya. Last reply by Fran Ayllón Aug 18, 2010. 2 Replies

The First Noble Truth

Started by Kaspalita. Last reply by Dharmavidya Mar 30, 2010. 5 Replies

The Humanity of Buddha

Started by Susthama. Last reply by Dharmavidya Oct 4, 2009. 1 Reply

The Fourth Noble Truth - The Eightfold Path Part Two

Started by Susthama. Last reply by Katrien Sercu Jun 27, 2009. 1 Reply

The Fourth Noble Truth - Marga Part One

Started by Susthama. Last reply by Katrien Sercu Jun 25, 2009. 1 Reply

Thw Third Noble Truth: Nirodha (Video talks)

Started by Kaspalita. Last reply by Kaspalita Jun 14, 2009. 1 Reply

The Second Noble Truth: Video Dharma talk (5 mins)

Started by Kaspalita. Last reply by Kaspalita Jun 14, 2009. 1 Reply

Reading "The Feeling Buddha"

Started by Sumaya. Last reply by Katrien Sercu Jun 13, 2009. 4 Replies

Rising Above Spiritual Danger

Started by Dharmavidya. Last reply by Dharmavidya May 1, 2009. 20 Replies

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Comment by Sujatin on December 22, 2013 at 12:13

Amida Newcastle are going to have regular Book Study evenings on some of our Tuesday sangha nights, from January 2014 - starting with The Feeling Buddha (by popular request).

Comment by Ras Danzen on April 21, 2009 at 22:17
Come to think of it ( as one does) no need to answer that last question, as I am pretty sure I have the answer now. Just needed to turn it over in my head for a while. Kindest thoughts - Kenny
Comment by Ras Danzen on April 20, 2009 at 9:42
Dear Dharmavidya Thank you, I just read the fist part of Union of Mahamudra and Dzogchen (online amazon), I would hope to read it all if I can obtain a copy. That quote " 'if you want to be a lineage guru then you must study at the feet of one master but for the great majority of practitioners the thing to do is to learn from every lama who comes within reach'. Has the ring of real wisdom.

(Having not read the book fully) I'm going to ask is it possible to be both - do both? Or is it really a case of one master OR many. ( in a mutually exclusive manner)

As Franco rightly points out the skating across the surface principle also Clark rightly points to the plurality principle in the west. --- The Shobogenzo points out that every Ancestor has bowed to the 'way'.

So to put it another way still, If one chooses the 'Many Master' approach does it discount one from becoming grounded and commited to one tradition (lineage).(especially in terms of Ordination)
Best foot forward x KL
Comment by Sahishnu (Joy Marston) on April 18, 2009 at 12:26
I have read all with interest but have too much and too little to say but even more to tentatively reach out and feel.
Comment by Dharmavidya on April 18, 2009 at 8:39
Typos are fun - I wonder what 'hat practice' might look like
> we encourage people to get deeply and extensively into hat practice

I meant 'that', of course.
Comment by Dharmavidya on April 18, 2009 at 8:37
Dear Franco - I agree with you. Cases do differ, of course. I myself first got involved in Buddhism in Cambridge (the English one) where I was exposed to Kargyu, Theravada and Zen at least all at once. I took them as all just different facets of the same thing and this has stayed with me (to my advantage, i believe). Yes, it is important for anindividual to get grounded in a practice. Here at Amida-shu the practice is nembutsu and we encourage people to get deeply and extensively into hat practice. However, I also hope that we do not become narrow and that we remain open to the whole breadth of the Buddhist tradition, and, indeed, to the wisdom of the sages of all spiritual traditions. The kind of diletantism that you are worried about is, however, a real problem too. As ever there are pitfalls in both directions. Find the middle way. Practise deeply - respect all. There is a big difference between embracing all through deep practice and skating along on the surface, but it is difficult for the beginner caught in habits of opinion to distinguish them. Namo Amida Bu.
Comment by Dharmavidya on April 18, 2009 at 6:58
Dear Zhenlian - That is a very nice list. I especially like 'the poetry of everyday life'. Thank you for joining us.
Comment by Shantikara on April 18, 2009 at 6:49
Aloha Dharmavidya - It seems that this would be a good path (to open oneself to more than one stream) for a practitioner that is fairly well-grounded (mature) in one tradition, prior to exploring other traditions. I see so many people (my only experience being limited to people in the USA) who practice with numerous gurus, seek therapy from numerous psychotherapists, etc in rapid fire consumer-like succession. They never seem to ripen in their practice. So, I agree in principle, but I would caution practitioners to be careful that they do not simply go broad rather than going deep. Do your thoughts differ?
Comment by Dharmavidya on April 18, 2009 at 6:30
Dear Clark - Yes, I completely agree. Actually there is a Tibetan book Union of Mahamudra and Dzogchen that says, (I quote loosely) 'if you want to be a lineage guru then you must study at the feet of one master but for the great majority of practitioners the thing to do is to leaqrn from every lama who comes within reach'. This is good policy, I think, and, even if one wants to be a lineage guru it is advisable to have opened oneself to the offerings of several other streams too. In the modern world this is even more important and I agree with you that despite much early sectarianism this will probably happen naturally in the West since we are inventors and cross-fertilizers and mostly not of he temperament to be restricted.
Comment by Zhenlian on April 18, 2009 at 1:33
For me the tags for Buddhism are : peace,humanity,simplicity,love for all creatures,harmony,equality for all creatures,the poetry of everyday life,aspiration to save humanity from all miseries, prayers to help all people to stay away from sin, no excessive ambitions.
 

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